Field Trips

 

THE FIELD TRIPS

Field trips are one of the most important activities of the Society and participation is the best way to increase one’s knowledge of local plants.  Most of the trips are for general study and monitoring of the flora and ecology of an area. Other trips are led by individuals who specialize in certain groups of plants and their trips are planned accordingly. While most trips emphasize plant study, other aspects of natural history are not neglected. Trip participants are always free to ask questions about anything of interest they see. The leader or other members of the group can often supply an answer.

The location may be any place of botanic interest which is usually within 50 miles of New York City.  We are not a hiking club and walking distances are usually not great. Those who come on the field trips are urged to participate in the Society’s other activities as well.  The phone numbers and e-mail addresses (when available) of each leader are given at the end of each trip description.  Trips generally go rain or shine; if in doubt, contact the leader.  Some trips are reachable only by automobile. Those in need of rides and those who are offering rides should post and check for messages on the Torrey Botanical Society Facebook and Twitter sites.  Bus and train schedules listed in trip descriptions are subject to change; those who use public transportation are advised to check updated schedules in advance.  Interested guests and non-members are always welcome on field trips.

Field trip leaders are asked to send full vegetation lists and notes on any new or unusual plants or vegetation types to the field chair:

Eric Morgan at morgane@farmingdale.edu
Subject line: “Torrey fieldtrip notes”

These lists, when submitted, will be made available through our website.

I would like to thank all trip leaders for their time and effort in supporting the Torrey field programs.

Happy trails!

Eric Morgan

2014 FIELD TRIP SCHEDULE

The Torrey Botanical Society has scheduled 15 trips for the 2014 field season, including joint trips with the Philadelphia Botanical Club, the Botanical Society of America’s Northeastern Section and the Olive Natural Heritage Society. Also listed below are two Bioblitzs. Stay tuned, as we will update the list throughout the year.

 

APRIL

Saturday, April 26th – SALEM AREA, CUMBERLAND AND SALEM COS., NJ. JOINT TRIP WITH THE PHILADELPHIA BOTANICAL CLUB.
Trip Leader – Gerry Moore gerry.moore@gnb.usda.gov
Numerous wet and dry habitats will be visited to see many wildflowers in bloom, including Anemone quinquefolia, Anemonella thalictroides, Caltha palustris, Cardamine concatenata, Chionanthus virginicus, Claytonia virginica, Houstonia caerulea, Maianthemum canadense, M. (Smilacina) racemosum, Panax trifolius and Polygonatum biflorum, Rare species we may be able to see in bloom include Amelanchier stolonifera (spicata), Helonias bullata, Listera australis, Malus angustifolia and Viola hirsutula. We may also search for Obolaria virginica at a historical location. This trip requires registration. Contact the trip leader to register and for meeting place.

 

MAY

Sunday, May 4th – WESTCHESTER WILDERNESS WALK – WESTCHESTER, NY
Trip Leader – Carol Levine. Meet at 10 AM. Westchester Wilderness Walk. Pound Ridge, N.Y. This property covers over 150 acres and offers 8 miles of trails through rocky woods, hillside streams and lakes. Dress with hiking boots. Parking is available only at the Upper Shad Road trailhead which is a quarter mile East of Long Ridge Road. Directions: Take Merritt Parkway to Exit 34, Long Ridge Road. Turn left (going North) onto Long Ridge Road and continue north about 6 miles, crossing border into Westchester county and look for Upper Shad road on the right. Turn right onto Upper Shad and continue about quarter mile to parking area on the left. Trip Leader – Carol Levine

Wednesday to Sunday, May 7th-11th – INVITATION TO THE 2014 JOINT FIELD MEETING OF THE: BOTANICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA, NORTHEASTERN SECTION TORREY BOTANICAL SOCIETY & PHILADELPHIA BOTANICAL CLUB – THE NATIONAL BEAGLE CLUB INSTITUTE FARM, ALDIE, VA
Trip Leader – Emily Southgate email ewbsouthgate@gmail.com phone 540-687-8291
The 2014 Joint Field Meeting will explore unusual and diverse habitats and botany in northern Virginia. We will stay at the historic Institute Farm in Aldie, Virginia. The basic fee will be $400 per person for meals, room and transportation to Chain Bridge Flats. The Institute Farm is a 500 acre property with abundant trails. There are several fields planted 2- 3 years ago in warm season grasses. Most of the property is second growth, though there is one fairly old oak woodlot. Accommodations will be cabins with bathrooms and showers in the main building, a very short walk across the lawn, or in the main building with baths down the hall. Cabins and rooms in the main building sleep from 2-6.Thecabins are rustic but personalized by their individual owners. To get the low room rate we have agreed to supply our own linens (sheets, pillow cases, towels and washcloths). Blankets and pillows are supplied by the Institute Farm. A very limited number of single rooms are available for an additional charge.
We are planning on visiting three fascinating areas. The Chain Bridge Flats are right in the shadow of Washington, DC, but because of the boulders and flooding, have never been developed. The habitat has allowed a large diversity of plants, including Midwestern disjuncts. Our guide is an expert on this area. Wildcat Mountain is includes rock outcrops with diverse and rare plants, especially those of rock outcrops.. Finally, we will also visit the G.R. Thompson Wildlife Management area, which has an extraordinary diversity of spring ephemerals and other woodland species. See below for more details on the areas that we will visit. We will be car pooling to Wildcat Mountain and G.W. Thompson and will have mini-buses to Chain Bridge Flats. Two of the walks are moderately strenuous but we will be taking it very slowly (at a botanist’s pace!). There will be speakers for the four evenings (Wed. through Saturday).

Saturday – Sunday, May 10th-11th – JOINT FIELD MEETING OF THE TORREY BOTANICAL SOCIETY, THE PHILADELPHIA BOTANICAL CLUB, THE OLIVE NATURAL HERITAGE SOCIETY AND THE CATSKILL WILDFLOWER SOCIETYDIAMOND NOTCH, GREENE CO. & BIG INDIAN WILDERNESS AREA, ULSTER CO.
Trip Leaders – Paul Harwood email pharwood27@me.com and Uli Lorimer email ulilorimer@bbg.org
This meeting will try to commemorate the collecting trips to the Catskills in the 1740’s of John and William Bartram, two of America’s first botanists of note. Our first venue (Saturday) will be Diamond Notch in Hunter-West Kill Wilderness Area, Greene County, to visit a rare first growth Fir-Spruce Forest to see the “Balm of Gilead” (Abies balsamea) that the Bartram’s collected on their journeys. Hopefully we will also sight Bartram’s serviceberry (Amelanchier bartramiana). Our second venue (Sunday) will be a hike to McKinley (McKenley) Hollow in Big Indian Wilderness Area, Ulster County, to see the spring ephemerals. Spring beauties, giant blue cohosh, hepatica, trout lilies, baneberries, bloodroot, trilliums, and other ephemerals should be very much in evidence. Joel Fry, the Curator of Bartram’s Garden in Philadelphia will be in attendance and giving a talk on the Bartram’s travels in the Catskills. (Time and venue TBA) Be prepared for uphill hikes with climbing on both hikes. Bring beverage, lunch, insect repellant or head net and proper waterproof footwear. As we will be at altitude it would be prudent to bring weatherproof, warm outerwear too. A list of accommodations will be provided for those who wish to stay overnight.

Saturday, May 17thVAN CORTLAND PARK, BRONX COUNTY, NY
Trip Leader – Leda Meredith email leda@ledameredith.net
This will be a foraging tour of Van Cortlandt Park. Learn how to identify edible spring plants that grow wild in NYC. Meet at 1 PM near the bottom of the stairs on the park (east) side of Broadway at the 242nd St. stop on the 1 train. Participants should wear comfortable walking shoes and clothes appropriate for the weather, and bring something to take notes on and pictures with.

Saturday, May 17thALLEY PARK SPRING FLORA AND INVASIVES SERVICE TRIP
Leader – Eric Morgan morgane@farmingdale.edu
This trip will highlight the changing forest of the Alley Park area from both natural succession and the influence of invasive species. The park has a number of spring ephemerals and some interesting bryophytes we will be on the lookout for. During this trip we will be removing several invasive species as we hike so bring gloves and pruning shears if you wish to help out. Meet at 10 am at the corner of 233rd St and 67th Ave. Parking is along street and is easily available.

 

June

Saturday, June 7thJAMAICA BAY WILDLIFE REFUGE, QUEENS COUNTY, NY
Leader – Richard Stalter
Meet at 9:00 AM at the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge Visitors’ Center. Jamaica Bay Wild Life Refuge encompasses 3,705 hectares. The refuge is part of the Gateway National Recreation Area, the country’s largest urban national park. Although much of the natural environment has been modified by grading and filling, many native plant species have been remarkably preserved. By car: From Brooklyn – Belt Pkwy. (east) to exit 17 (Crossbay Blvd.) go over North Channel Bridge and continue 1 mi. past the bridge at the traffic light to the entrance to the Refuge on the right. From Rockaway – Take CrossbayBridge (94 St.) and go through Broad Channel Community. Refuge visitor center is about 0.5 mi. on the left. By public transportation:train:Take the A train going to Rockaways. Exit at Broad Channel Station. Walk west to Crossbay Blvd. then north, (right), about 0.5 mi. to the refuge. By bus: take Green Bus Line Q21 from Liberty Ave. (Queens) to 116th St. (Rockaway) to the refuge; or take Triboro Q53 bus from Roosevelt Ave./Jackson Heights. Exit at refuge stop. You can also take the Greenline Q21 from the intersection of Woodhaven and Liberty Ave. Exit at refuge entrance.

Friday – Saturday, June 13th & 14thUNION COUNTY BIOBLITZ.   The 10th annual Union County BioBlitz will be held at Oak Ridge and Ashbrook Parks. Please see their website for more details and to sign up to participate.

Saturday – Sunday, June 28th & 29thUPPER DELAWARE BIOBLITZ,  SULLIVAN COUNTY.   The 2014 Upper Delaware BioBlitz will take place at the confluence of the Delaware River and Ten Mile River on the Ten Mile River Scout Camp. Please see their website for more details and to sign up to participate.

 

July

Saturday July 12thNEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN FOREST AND NATIVE PLANT GARDEN
Leader Jessica Arcate-Schuler
Meet at 12:30 at the Garden reflecting pool for a tour of The New York Botanical Garden forest, and at 2:30 pm for a tour of the recently opened Native Plant Garden. Both of these interpretive tours will be hosted by the Curator of the forest and will be a great chance to see numerous summer wildflowers including Aralia racemosa. Tours are free with garden admission. See NYBG website for directions.

Saturday – Sunday July 2nd-3rd – INTERMITTENT PONDS, ATLANTIC, CAPE MAY, CUMBERLAND COS., NJ. JOINT TRIP WITH THE PHILADELPHIA BOTANICAL CLUB
Trip Leaders – Gerry Moore gerry.moore@gnb.usda.gov and Uli Lorimer ulilorimer@bbg.org
This two day trip will explore intermittent ponds. The focus will be on ponds that have not been extensively surveyed due to difficult access or their not appearing as ponds (or even wetlands) on the USGS topographic maps (7.5 minute quadrangles), a primary reference for earlier botanists. Rare species we will be looking for include: Boltonia asteroides, Coreopsis rosea, Dichanthelium wrightianum, Eleocharis melanocarpa, E. quadrangulata, Lobelia canbyi, Ludwigia linearis, Muhlenbergia torreyana, Nymphoides cordata, Panicum hemitomon, Pasaplum dissectum, Rhynchospora inundata, R. nitens. R. scirpodes, Rotala ramosior, Sagittaria teres, Sclerolepis uniflora, Utricularia purpurea, U. radiata and U. resupinata. This trip requires registration. Contact the trip leader to register and for meeting place.

 

 

September

Saturday, September 6th – MARINE PARK AND FLOYD BENNETT FIELD, KINGS CO. NY
Leader Rebecca Swadek email rebecca.swadek@parks.nyc.gov
Meet at 10 AM at the parking area across from the Salt Marsh Nature Center off Avenue U and west of Flatbush Avenue. We will explore the salt marsh and grassland restorations at Marine Park and, if time permits, head across the street to Floyd Bennett Field to explore older restorations and coastal maritime habitats. Some of the hiking may be in wet areas and will require waterproof footwear, e.g. knee boots or waders. Bring plenty of water, snacks/lunch, and insect repellent. Long pants are recommended for poison ivy and salt marsh grasses.
Directions by car: Take the Belt Parkway and take exit 11N for Flatbush Avenue to the North. Continue N on Flatbush and turn left (west) onto Avenue U. In about 0.6 miles, you will pass the Marine Park Salt Marsh Nature Center on your left and turn right into the cricket field parking lot across the street. No parking is allowed in the nature center lot.
Directions by public transit: Take the Q to Kings Highway and transfer to the B31 bus towards Gerritsen Beach. Get off at Gerritsen Avenue and Avenue U and walk east to the parking lot on your left. Or the 2/5 to Flatbush Avenue/Brooklyn College (last stop) and transfer to the Q35 bus towards Rockaway Park B. 116 St. Get off at Flatbush Avenue and Avenue U and walk west to the parking lot on your right.

Saturday, September 6th – REPAUPO, GLOUCESTER CO., NJ. JOINT TRIP WITH THE PHILADELPHIA BOTANICAL CLUB.
Trip Leaders – Gerry Moore gerry.moore@gnb.usda.gov and Uli Lorimer email ulilorimer@bbg.org
We will visit a number of habitats including, Atlantic white cedar (Chamaecyparis thyoides) swamps and freshwater tidal wetlands along the Delaware River. A number of rare species have been historically reported from this area, including: Aeschynomene virginica, Bidens bidentoides, Cyperus engelmannii, Cyperus lancastriensis, Elephantopus carolinianus, Epilobium angustifolium, Eriocaulon parkeri, Eriophorum gracile, Gymnopogon brevifolius, Heteranthera multiflora, Pinus serotina, Platanthera ciliaris, Polygala mariana, Ranunculus ambigens, Rhynchospora inundata, Sagittaria subulata, Spiranthes laciniata, Stachys tenuifolia, and Utricularia gibba. (This is a re-attempt of the trip held on 29 June 2013, many of the sites not being explored then due to high water levels.) This trip requires registration. Contact the trip leaders to register and for meeting place.

Saturday, September 13th – ABBOTT MARSHLANDS, MERCER COUNTY, NJ
AKA HAMILTON – BORDENTOWM MARSH
Trip Leader – Mary Leck email leck@rider.edu
Aquatic plants for beginners but all are welcome. Meet 10 AM at the Mercer County Roebling Park parking lot at Spring Lake, Hamilton, NJ. For directions and map, see www.marsh-friends.org. Take South Broad St. (NJ. 206) in Hamilton to Sewell Ave.; at the end of Sewell, turn left and drive down the hill. In the morning, we will examine common wetland species in and around the lake, but Heteranthera multiflora and Wolffiella gladiata, NJ rare species, are likely. After lunch, we will visit a tidal marsh or swamp site, part of the northernmost tidal freshwater wetland on the Delaware River. Hip boots or VERY old footwear are recommended. In PM unless site is filled in, we will look for Ammania coccinia, last seen in NJ 100 yrs ago; Bidens bidentoides is also a possibility. Bring lunch, beverage, and insect repellent. For information about the Abbott Marshlands see: www.marsh-friends.org.

Saturday, September 13th – BARTLETT ARBORETUM FOREST, FAIRFIELD, CT
Trip Leader -  Jon Borysiewicz
Meet at 10 am in the visitors parking lot. Forest and wetland ecology walk. This hike leads through mixed deciduous woodlands as well as a 2 acre wetland with a substantial boardwalk. Highlights of the trip will include a descriptive tour of the sites ecology, as well as several notable plants including a number of early fall blooming Asteraceae and Cyperaceae. Bring lunch. Picnic area is available.
Directions: Merritt Parkway to Exit 35 North, follow High Ridge Road about 1 mile then make left on Brookdale Road. Entrance on right about 1/2 mile from turn.


October

Saturday, October 4th – CRANBERRY BOG PRESERVE, SUFFOLK COUNTY, NY
Trip Leader – Andy Greller
Meet at 11 am. An interpretive hike through one of Long Islands premiere botanical spots. This pine barrens environments is a great place to see numerous Ericaceae, as well as several species of carnivirous plants. Bring water and adequate footwear.
Directions: Take LIE east to the end, then take 25 east three miles to County Road 63, turn right onto CR 63. Entrance on County Road 63 in Riverhead.

Saturday October 4th – PROSPECT PARK, KINGS COUNTY, NY
Trip Leader – Leda Meredith email leda@ledameredith.com
This will be a foraging tour of Prospect Park. Learn how to identify edible fall plants that grow wild in NYC. Meet at 1 PM at the Grand Army Plaza entrance to Prospect Park at the gazebo closest to Prospect Park West. Participants should wear comfortable walking shoes and clothes appropriate for the weather, and bring something to take notes on and pictures with.